Amelia-cover_kindle

Cynthia is one of my occasional forays into Science Fiction Romance. I, really we since I work closely with a good friend, mostly write historical romantic fiction with a dark twist and this book sits nicely in the midst of my two literary loves. Cynthia is a freelance pilot, a privateer, at the edge of human space. Even with a jump drive, the times involved in space travel are enormous and lonely. The time is mitigated by a drug that essentially makes her immortal and as a side effect dampens emotions. Loneliness is another matter. Her companion is a sentient computer program by the name of Chris. She’s foul-mouthed, callous, and prone to take things that aren’t technically speaking, hers. He, the program, is often shocked at her behavior.

One of the things she steals, what she thinks is a bauble, gets her into deeper trouble than she expects – and as an accidental side effect of a lucky shot when she’s escaping – she’s sent into 19th century England. That’s when the fun starts.

I won’t spoil the story with a long synopsis. She gets into and out of trouble more than once, and finds love. It is a romance after all, ending happily after ever. Or at least for now.

Why did I write it?

I could say snark, stubbornness and to show those smirking English professors at my institution what a scientist can do. Not to mention showing my high-school teachers that an illiterate bum can learn to write, and write dashed well if I say so myself. That’s not the whole reason.

One consistent theme in my work is overcoming isolation. The isolation of being a foreigner even in your own land and your own time. Not fitting in, but eventually finding a way. How does that awkward girl or boy who’s only at the dance because their parents forced them out of the house find their way into society? At least without becoming a sociopath or an emotional cripple. How do people heal and grow?

Cynthia is literally a foreigner, completely lost in time. Her computer could teach her Regency English and manners, but not strip the essence of her character. She knows things the others don’t, and can’t tell them. At least not initially. Although she does get excited about the HMS Erebus, a rocket ship, only to be disappointed when it only launches rockets.

The man, James, Lord Wroxham, (every regency romance has a Lord somebody in it. I wonder how commoners ever got married) similarly is socially isolated. Not that people dislike him, but he’s been pursued by so many gull-catchers and designing woman, that he’s built a distance, a reserve, between him and the world. A wall that very few people can breach.

The story explores how these very different and yet surprisingly similar people negotiate the shoals of a relationship.

You can find Amelia online here:

You can Cynthia the Invincible here

My thanks to Amelia for stopping by to share the story of Cynthia. What say you, readers? Doesn’t it sound fascinating?

I love comments so much that I pick a favorite to receive my monthly AnaBanana gift basket ($25 value).  (And don’t forget that once a quarter I’ll be tossing in something fun from the Perilously Fun Shop!) Recipient is announced the first blog post of the new month.

Perilously yours,

Pauline

Why Amelia Treader wrote Cynthia the Invincible

5 thoughts on “Why Amelia Treader wrote Cynthia the Invincible

  • May 18, 2016 at 2:05 pm
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    Sounds different. Wishing all the best with the new release

  • May 18, 2016 at 2:05 pm
    Permalink

    Sounds different. Wishing all the best with the new release

  • May 18, 2016 at 4:57 am
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    Cynthia the Invincible sounds very interesting. Since I like both Scifi and Historical Romance, I’m adding it to my list!

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