cover art Well, I thought I’d begin the answer to that question by talking about why I started writing steampunk romances. It was because of my host on this blog, Pauline Baird Jones, actually.

At Apollo Con in 2008, Pauline and I were chatting as we sat at a booth selling our books and she told me about steampunk. It’s Victorian Sc-fi and I’ve also heard it described as historical Sci-fi with a nod to the great Victorian era writers such as Jules Verne, H.G. Wells, Robert Louis Stevenson, Edgar Allan Poe, Mary Shelly, and Bram Stoker. Though I hadn’t heard the term steampunk before Pauline mentioned it, as soon as she told me about it, I realized I loved the genre and that it fit my writer voice.

I made the heroine, Ceridwen, a ghost because I love funny ghost stories and also because it seems to me that a story set in Victorian London should have one or more ghosts in it. The heroine, Ceridwen, was inspired by a trainer at a customer service job I had. She was bright and bubbly and loved food. She’d get so excited about all the potlucks we had. I’ve never eaten so well in any training class. We had potlucks every other day. In To Love A London Ghost, my heroine can’t eat, as she’s a spirit, so she talks about food all the time and floats around the dining table smelling all the delicious Victorian fare, especially the yummy desserts…all those puddings. And, I love the ancient Celts, so I made my character Ceridwen the ghost of a Celtic warrior woman, who died fighting Julius Caesar on the banks of the river Thames. That choice of heroine worked out well because a spear wielding warrior woman is the perfect type of girl for Sexton Dukenfield.

Sexton is the hero of To Love A London Ghost. He’s a self-made man, a ghost hunter. He grew up as an orphan on the streets of London, which is why his voice is so husky; it’s from the exposure to all the cold winters with no shelter. Sexton has no desire to fit into social circles and no respect for authority. He’s usually grumpy. Outlandishly so. Still, there is an incredible sweetness in his nature,. He works hard to hide it, but his concern for others always manages to shine through.

Though you can call To Love A London Ghost a steampunk romance it also totally fits the genre of a Victorian romance and it’s a comedy. In addition, it includes a lot of fun information on the ancient Celts and it has ghosts in it for the paranormal lovers.

I recently republished To Love A London Ghost, this time using the name Cornelia Amiri instead of Maeve Alpin, that was the pen name I originally published it under. The cover of the new edition is featured here. You can get the ebook at Banres and Nobles, Kobo, Itunes and here is the link for it at Amazon.

cornelia-photoDrawing on my love of a happy ending I have currently penned over 30 published romance books under my name, Cornelia Amiri, and my pen name of Maeve Alpin. I and my muse, Severus the Cat, live amid the hustle and bustle of humid Houston, Texas, as does my wonderful son and granddaughter. When not writing, I love to read, watch movies, and attend local steampunk events and comic cons.  I’m currently working on the next book in my Druidry and the Beast series and on a sci-fi comedy romance series with a Celtic goddess as the heroine.

Visit me at my website,  Facebook, or twitter @CorneliaAmiri

I am so glad we had that conversation! And thanks for sharing your fun post! Okay readers, ghosts? Steampunk? Comedy? What is not to love?

I love comments so much that I pick a favorite to receive my monthly AnaBanana gift basket ($25 value).  (And don’t forget that once a quarter I’ll be tossing in something fun from the Perilously Fun Shop!) Recipient is announced the first blog post of the new month.

Perilously yours,

Pauline

Why Cornelia Amiri wrote To Love A London Ghost
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