Pauline Baird Jones, author, writer, romantic suspense author, science fiction romance author, steampunk, humor, action adventure
This big tree is #16 on the registry of the Live Oak Society. And he’s not the biggest tree in the society. Copyright by WyoJones. All rights reserved. Used with permission.

Wishing for a Wormhole Friday is all about trees. Do you remember Clint Eastwood singing about talking to the trees? (Ouch alert before you click through! Seriously, think about it. Okay, here’s the link.) I love trees. There were a lot of them to love when we moved to New Orleans, but what I did not know (among all the many things I did not know about Louisiana), is that the Live Oak trees have their own Society.

Pauline Baird Jones, author, writer, romantic suspense author, science fiction romance author, steampunk, humor, action adventure
“To become a member, a live oak must have a girth (waistline) of eight feet or greater. Girths over 16 feet are classified as centenarian.” (If that’s what it takes, I’m happy to be excluded!) Copyright by WyoJones. All rights reserved. Used with permission.

The current president (oh, yes, there is a president) of the society is “Seven Sisters Oak,” who is estimated to be at least 1200 years old. Only one human is allowed in the society. She is responsible for registering and recording the Live Oak Members. The original society had 43 members but has expanded to over 7,000 and includes “members” from all over the country.

Pauline Baird Jones, author, writer, romantic suspense author, science fiction romance author, steampunk, humor, action adventure
I suppose it is wrong of me to want to build a tree house in this huge, bad boy (girl?)? Or to just climb it? Cause that is a sweet, climbing tree. Copyright by WyoJones. All rights reserved. Used with permission.

So? Did you know the Live Oaks had their own club? Were you surprised? In the know? Would you climb it if you got the chance? Are you feeling quite sleek knowing your girth disqualifies you for this club? Have a weird factoid to share?

(You can see more awesome, tree pictures on the hubs photostream.)

Show me some comment love and you’re automatically entered into my monthly drawing for a $10 AnaBanana gift card. Winner is announced in the first blog post of the new month (which just happens to be this blog post!).

And there is a second chance to win some AnaBanana goodness. Just visit my blog post: “You Don’t Have To Die to Get into the Little Cities of the Dead,” about the New Orleans cemeteries. 🙂

Pauline Baird Jones, author, writer, romantic suspense author, science fiction romance author, steampunk, humor, Project Enterprise

And the February winner is: Lynette M. Burrows! Congratulations!

Perilously (and feeling rather sveldt in my girth),

Pauline

While I have not written books about awesome trees, I have written novels that include: action, adventure, romance and humor! You can find out more about them by visiting paulinebjones.com. My books are available in print, digital and audio!

I Talk to the Trees…but they are in a Meeting. No really.

10 thoughts on “I Talk to the Trees…but they are in a Meeting. No really.

  • March 2, 2013 at 4:34 am
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    I’m impressed that the trees were clever enough to form their own society 🙂

    I spent a couple of years in Texas, where oak trees have small leaves, which seemed odd to me since I grew up in Canada, where the oak trees in my home town have leaves larger than your hand. My theory is that the larger leaves have evolved to soak in as much of the all-too-brief Canadian summer sunshine as they can. Thanks for the entertaining post!

    • March 2, 2013 at 9:28 am
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      We have VERY smart trees down here. LOL I had not thought about the leaf size. Hmmm, because yeah, I grew up in WY with bigger leaves. Many thanks for stopping by! 🙂

  • March 1, 2013 at 5:39 pm
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    Way cool. Both that the trees have their own society and that I won the gift certificate! Seriously I love the look of Spanish Moss hanging on those old oak trees – especially when they are creepy – and can only imagine the things they have seen! Your post and pictures make me want to visit the south again (um, and maybe the unusual amount of snow we’ve gotten in the past week). 🙂

    • March 2, 2013 at 9:26 am
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      I sent you an email about how to get your gift certificate! Hope you like the goodies! I love AnaBanana! Yeah, the trees are cool and creepy. And yeah, we are free of snow down here! 🙂

  • March 1, 2013 at 5:13 pm
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    Magnificent trees, all!

    … the first time I saw ‘Paint Your Wagon’ it took me a while to get over the shock of Clint warbling along with the orchestra, but, all-in-all he didn’t do too badly!

    • March 2, 2013 at 9:27 am
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      No, he wasn’t awful, but I think it was the idea of Clint singing. I can’t get over it. He’s Dirty Harry, not Bing Crosby. It was just wrong! LOL

  • March 1, 2013 at 9:39 am
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    When we lived in Mississippi the Live Oak trees were everywhere. They were absolutely gorgeous in the daytime but seemed to morph into grotesque creatures of the night when the sun went down. Moss clung to them in sheets and moved with a strange rhythm on the summer breezes. In one year we had both Hurricane Florence and Tropical Storm Beryl slam into us just a few weeks apart. Florence was a bit of a fizzle but Beryl was nasty and went on for days as it bobbled along the coast, first toward New Orleans then back toward Mobile several times. We, of course, were in the middle of it so it was always over us as it wove it’s way east, then back west – back and forth, back and forth. When the storms were gone, those mighty trees in their bright green fur coats stood tall above the debris of man made objects. Jefferson Davis’ home in Biloxi is shaded by many of these stately old guards.

    • March 1, 2013 at 10:09 am
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      You are so right about the night time trees! Totally creepy. When you realize that storms have always been hitting a lot of those tree places and that they’ve endured for over a thousand years…i think next hurricane i’ll tie myself to one of them! O.O

  • March 1, 2013 at 3:16 am
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    As a UK reader, I have only come across “Live Oaks” in Sidney Lanier’s poetry (eg The Marshes of Glynn) but have always been intrigued by the phrase. Cool to know they have their own variation of an ent-moot!

    • March 1, 2013 at 8:37 am
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      Isn’t that funny? The first time I heard about the Society, I was like, what? They what? But they are trees. The Ents were my favorite characters, btw. I love trees.

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